BIOMECHANICA FUNCIONAL

Pablo Scorza Biomechanica Funcional, prevention of climbing injuries

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Functional Biomechanics of climbing is a proven injury prevention method that’s been developed specially for climbers. The goal is to minimise injuries and in the long term help climbers to keep improving and developing.

In rock climbing the majority of injuries are cumulative. So, if you keep doing the same thing poorly or without the required strength or flexibility then eventually you’ll be laid up with an injury. But by using Functional Biomechanics preventative training nearly all injuries can be avoided.

It’s not rocket science, but less injuries will make you a better climber. Avoiding any layoff means you keep evolving as a climber and progressively improve your ability. Plus cutting out minor niggly injuries helps you to constantly push your climbing to the max.

An added bonus of Functional Biomechanics of climbing is that the exercises you’ll learn will directly benefit you on the face. They improve muscle harmony, sense of balance, flexibility and the all-important self-body knowledge.

A well balanced body is more coordinated, so Functional Biomechanics of climbing teaches you to be more aware of your body. This helps you become stronger, more accurate and your movements more efficient, all of which will help you send tougher routes.

 

Workshop goal

The primary objective is for the climber to learn how to avoid injuries and fully recover quicker. This is achieved through exercises that prepare the deep structure of the body before climbing, but also compensate and re-equilibrate after.

To achieve this we learn to differentiate the biotype of each climber. We can then focus the workshop individually so you can adapt the exercises to your own needs. Ultimately every climber will learn how to take care of himself on and off the face.

The workshop if suitable for all climbers, regardless of ability and experience.

 

What You’ll learn

The workshop combines theory and practice which is adapted to individual needs. Theory is then put into practice with climbing each day.

 

Functional Biomechanics of climbing: Theory

- Fascial tissue: function and importance

- Elastin and collagen the connective tissue proteins. Differences between them and their relationship to connective tissue disorders and aging.

- What are the muscle chains

- Postural evolution: From neuromotor development of a baby to biomechanics of a climber

- Functional Biomechanics of climbing: agonist and antagonist muscle groups

- Finger injuries

- Stretch concept: learning how to stretch depending on the target

- Neuromotor dysfunction in the climber

- Autonomic nervous system and ball-work

- Examples of interesting clinical cases

- The importance of injury prevention in climbing

- The importance and influence of nutrition, psychology, emotional and social support

- Posture evaluation and how it influences climbing and injuries for different biotypes

- Learn to demystify: listening to your body and no ‘one size fits all’

 

Functional Biomechanics of climbing: Practical

You’ll learn a sequence of climbing exercises that become progressively more difficult. They follow a logical order to help you remember the sequence, and you’ll be encouraged to adapt the exercise to suit your needs.

Using a ball you’ll follow a stretching and balancing routine that will improve your climbing strength and flexibility. You’ll also learn climber specific stretches that will help prevent injury and keep you on the face longer.

As important as the routine is learning how to adjust the frequency and intensity of the exercises depending on your objectives. From this you can maintain long term progression and help to avoid injury through Functional Biomechanics of climbing.